Skip to main content

About your Search

English 35
Search Results 0 to 34 of about 35 (some duplicates have been removed)
president, mahmoud abbas and then will fly to egypt to speak with president mohamed morsi. that is going to be a very interesting conversation, because, of course, as so many of you are aware, morsi is in a tough situation. many of the people in egypt, obviously, don't support working with israel at all. and within the past hour, there were several explosions in gaza city. let's get straight to our team there. >> obviously, looks like we're having a problem with that shot. we'll be getting there in just a moment. difficult to communicate with them, because of these rockets that have been going off. let's try again. let's go back there to ben. >> here in gaza. there were a few hours of relative quiet. but as we have seen within really the last 15 minutes, an intense attack on a building behind right where i am. it's a complex where we understand there are some government offices, and we understand from other palestinian sources that some of the security personnel who were vacated from other areas, other offices around gaza, may have been working out of that building. so certainly there wa
. instead, the office of the e jimgs president, mohamed morsi, told cnn the egyptian government has no plans to make an announcement tonight. since wednesday of last week militants have fired hundreds of rockets into israel. we're about to bring you one family's harrowing story of dodging the rocket that hit their home today. random attacks like this provoke ferocious air assaults on gaza by the israelis, which also continued today. [ gunfire ] about two hours ago a reuters camera in gaza city caught this explosion. cnn's ben wedeman reports a building near the city was likely hit by an israeli air strike in gaza. he was on live with hala gorani when the explosion happened. take a look. >> i think it's pretty clear that we are moving in the direction of -- [ gunfire ] i can hear shattering glass out there right now. the building just shook of course because i was looking at the camera i didn't see where the blast took place. anybody see it? okay. to the north of this building here. so despite talk of cease fire, hala, it appears that the guns are still firing. >> the gaza ministry of health
it in the fascinating relationship between president obama and mohammed morsi. two mag ma tist pragmatists trya way to mediate this. you see it in the backdrop of surprising riots in jordan which will cause increasing problems, you have that changing environment which you know far more about. but the arab street needs something different. these governments now need to be more responsive to their people so that is an opening for a different relationship. and the president, no american president is going to criticize israel's launching of this war. but this is an opening for a relationship with egypt, with turkey, to implement a cease-fire that will monitor arms smuggling into gaza. that will monitor israel's relationship. overarching all of it, such a painful issue to discuss. overarching -- all of it is a history. going back at least to '67. of the united states' role, maybe, the united states' role as the enabler. as the political diplomatic economic military enabler of an israeli policy. in many ways, a younger generation is seeing israelis, that is not in the long-term benefit of the security of
with palestinian president mahmoud abbas and she is set to sit down with egyptian president mohamed morsi. >>> no claim of responsibility on that bus explosion yet but word is that hamas has blessed the attacks. we go to ben wedeman for more on that. >> reporter: what we heard from a nearby mosque is an announcement saying that, quote, unquote, lions from the west bank had carried out that attack in tel aviv. there was also the suggestion in that announcement from the mosque that hamas was somehow responsible for that attack. however, the television affiliated with the hamas movement said yes, they did bless that attack but said it was a, quote, unquote, natural reaction to israel's offensive against the gaza strip. so, there has been no claim of responsibility by hamas or by anybody else at this point regarding that attack. now there was some scattered celebratory gunfire in gaza after news of the attack in tel aviv. i'm not aware of anybody handing out candy. it's important to stress that not everybody supports hamas in the gaza strip. and there are many people who are unhappy with the
think they're pretty close right now. i know that the egyptian president, mohamed morsi, very much involved. he's got good relations with hamas, israelis have a relationship, i don't know how good it is, but they have a relationship with the egyptians. there have been israeli envoys that have gone to cairo to meet with high-ranking egyptian officials. trying to broker a deal. no trust, hamas has to trust for the israelis and israelis have no trust for the hamas. there have been a lot of rockets and missiles coming from gaza into israeli and the israeli air strikes pounded away at targets in garz. a lot of casualties. there's no goodwill on the part of either of these, they don't trust each other. having said that, looks like they're close. hamas seems to think within the next hour or two some agreement will be announced, thanks to the egyptians. but i spoke with the israeli government spokesman for the israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu in the past hour, he said there's no deal yet. he didn't rule out there wouldn't be a deal but he said there's no deal yet. until all of the
said president mohamed morsi. clearly he felt that his position was greatly strengthened by brokering this peace deal between israel and hamas in gaza. but i think he's overplayed his hand. you just showed that video of the protests there in cairo. we'll have to see where this goes. the great fear is that the muslim brotherhood, like other fascist organizations, will be one man, one vote, one time. and we've seen the muslim blo brotherhood move very swift tloi consolidate their power. >> the u.s. stood squarely behind israel throughout this conflict. does that quiet any critics who thought president obama was soft on israeli security? >> i think it absolutely should. what we saw even before the election here in the united states is that netanyahu has said time and again even in the face of critics that there has been no stronger ally to israel than the united states. the criticism kept comincoming, though. after this incident, i really do think the critics will be quieted. there's a lot of talk about how successful the iron dome program wus was. it deflected over 80% of the rockets th
the hamas leadership and the egyptian government of the new president, mohamed morsi, who, himself, is a leader of the muslim brotherhood. there is a new gee rhregime in right now. they went out of their way to praise morsi for his role now. there could be an improvement in israeli-egyptian relations if this agreement holds. that's a big if right now. we'll see what happens in the coming hours. we're watching it closely. >> ben wedeman, egypt has a role in basically monitoring developments and has a responsibility now according to this agreement, the parameters of the cease-fire. egypt, will they be able to stop smuggling of hamas weapons through those tunnels, from egypt into gaza city? because there is a lot of concern obviously on the israeli side of the border that hamas will use any kind of a cease-fire, use any stopping of violence to basically replenish their stockpile of weapons. >> really is up to the political will of the egyptian leadership to make sure this happens. we have seen it in the past that the egyptians will sort of tighten and loosen their hold on gaza when th
is in cairo where she met with president mohamed morsi of egypt who's mediating the discussions. as secretary clinton carries the official white house message there is new attention being paid to the president's strategic options in the region. "the washington post" writes president obama's decision to send his top diplomat on an emergency middle east peace making mission tuesday marked an administration shift to a more active vist role in the region's affairs and offered clues to how he may use the political elbow room afforded by a second term. beyond a cease-fire agreement, the president could try to throw his political clout behind a larger, long-term solution here. so far, no deal has materialized between israel and gaza. also, a bus bombing in tel aviv could push both sides further apart. 19 people were injured, three critically, in what was the first terror attack in israel in four years. police say, however, the incident was not a suicide bombing. joining me now, former assistant secretary of state, p.j. crowley and from tel aviv, nbc news correspondent stephanie gosk. thank you, both
president mahmoud abbas. before flying out to cairo to consult with egyptian president mohammed morsi at the center of the efforts to bring durable cease-fire. the violence in gaza was jeff shadowing president obama's trip to asia, which was supposed to be a calm swan song enabling the outgoing secretary of state to bask over her work in countrys like burma. instead, both spent much of their time in asia intensively dialing up mideast leaders. the president speaking with morsi three times in 24 hours. including aboard air force one on the way home to america. the president tan secretary both been on the phone, nonstop with regional leaders for a number of days. the purpose of her trip is to continue and intensify that engagement now face to face. >> the stakes for the president are enormous on the eaves of a second term. with analysts warping it may be the beginning of a much wider conflict between israel and iran. >> there is rise of al-qaeda and radical islam in the middle east that have taken advantage of the re-lutionnary change sweeping through the region. in the shadows here is
with palestinian authority leaders and going to cairo to meet with mohamed morsi. i wouldn't be surprised based on what i'm hearing if there is no deal yet, she might come back to jerusalem, engage in some shuttle diplomacy, akin to henry kissinger. if israel moves into gaza with massive amounts of grounds forces, tanks, heavy artillery, armored personnel carriers, it will be a disaster. you know this area, you're there. you know how densely populated it is. it's going to be a serious problem and what the u.s. and egyptians, most of the international community, they want make sure israelis don't do it. but prime minister benjamin netanyahu say to keep the rockets and missiles come there coming in, they might have to do it. >> the death toll now in gaza, palestinian officials say is 137 people killed so far in the seven, now eight days going into the conflict. official death toll for israel is five. one soldier was killed today, first soldier killed by a rocket fires from gaza. joined by arwa damon and been ben wedeman. the blasts bring home the difficulties so many civilians face. people don't
president mahmoud abbas and with egyptian president mohammed morsi tomorrow. i want to bring in cnn's wolf blitzer, who is live for us in jerusalem tonight, and anderson cooper and ben wedeman, both in gaza city. wolf, let me start with you if i may. a very tense day with claim and counterclaim coming almost on an hourly basis. there was going to be a cease-fire, then no cease-fire. both sides trading sort of insults and then offering fig leaves. what do you make of it all? as we talk now in the middle of a night there, what do you make of where we really are with this? >> well, throughout most of the day, i thought they were very close to reaching a cease-fire agreement. all the signs looked rather positive. then all of a sudden, on this day, it was getting increasingly more tense in the southern part of israel and what we've been seeing in gaza, very, very bloody as well. you wouldn't know that they are apparently rather close to some sort of a deal, that the egyptian government, the new president, mohammed morsi, seemed to be brokering. they may still get some sort of cease-fire agreeme
.s. secretary of state hillary clinton and mohammed morsi who pushed for a cease fire, the agreement calls for discussion of a number of issues, including freedom of movement for palestinians in and out of gaza. and the agreement not to target the area in gaza, and to halt rocket fire into israel. again, a discussion, nothing is a done deal. over the next hour we'll look at the negotiations still happening now. we'll also hear from the spokeswoman for the israeli defense forces and from the leader of hamas. plus our reporters on the ground and a whole lot more. we begin with a look at what has transpired over just the last 24 hours. it is remarkable there was a cease-fire this hour, when you consider how this wednesday started off. take a look. add midday, no sign of a truce yet when a city bus is bombed in tel-aviv. at least two dozen were wounded. israeli police say terrorists left two bombs on the bus and fled. only one exploded. hamas praised the attack near the headquarters of the israeli defense forces but the group didn't claim responsibility. farther south in israeli a home was hit
in gaza today. a planned cease-fire for the visit never materialized while president mohamed morsi made it clear whose side egypt is on. >> translator: we support the people of gaza. we are with them in their trenches. what hurts them hurts us. and the blood that flows from their children is our blood too. >> so most of the west, including the united states sides with israel. a nation now on the brink of staging a ground assault. israel's deputy foreign minister told cnn this morning that would trigger that move. >> if we will see in the next 24, 36 hours more rockets, launched at us, i think that would be the trigger. >> ben wedeman joins me now from the israel/gaza border. what are you seeing and hearing there now? >> reporter: it is a bit surreal here. we're in the city's marina right next to the yoko sushi restaurant. as you can see, there are people out, having dinner. seemingly to be living a normal life. but the owner of this restaurant did tell us just an hour ago they heard the air raid sirens and in fact just a moment ago we saw in this screen with israeli television that in b
's in cairo and meeting with the egyptian president mohammed morsi who has emerged as a key player in the effort to try to end the fighting between israel and hamas. but mr. morsi walking a very tight political and social, for that matter, tight rope. reza sayah joining us from cairo. reza, morsi playing a pivot on the role, as egypt has in the past, in these talks. balancing the expectations of his street, the people that elected him and the muslim brotherhood, as well as the u.s. and the international community and all that is bound into that. >> yeah. michael, in many ways as we speak today egyptian president mohammed morsi is viewed as maybe the most important voice for the palestinians on the world stage, and to understand the type of pressure he is under it's so important to understand how arabs, how egyptians view this conflict between the palestinians and the israelis because it is very different from the western view. egyptians, arabs, look at the latest round of fighting, and they see more than 130 palestinians killed compared to five israelis killed. they should taking o
to the government in egypt, the president mohamed morsi, that they would stop firing into israel. if that were to be revoked, that would be a violation. they would be breaking their word to the egyptians and that would cause some serious repercussions i assume, christiane, between the egypt government, muslim brotherhood-led government, and hamas. >> reporter: well, i was obviously talking about what's the perspective from this side was. but of course israel's demand was that there would be no more rockets and no more of that fire going into israel. that was something they really wanted. and of course israel does not want to see hamas resupplied through the tunnel network. that is still to be worked out. i asked him whether or not he got weapons and whether hamas was getting weapons from iran, and he gave me a non-confirmation confirmation. it's an open secret that they come through those tunnels. so that has to be taken in hand. we're not sure how that's going to happen, but obviously there is some egyptian role in that as well. but, yes, egypt is the guarantor of this cease-fire. neither sid
to hear, egypt's president mohamed morsi suggesting progress in attempts at brokering a cease-fire. and backing hamas, released a statement saying, the travesty of the israel aggression on gaza will end in a few hours. we're going to get to the details of all of this and the apparent pause in fighting in just a moment. but first, we want to look at the united states role and all the various players that are involved in this. and in about an hour, secretary of state hillary clinton is to meet with israel prime minister benjamin netanyahu. tomorrow, she is scheduled to meet with the palestinian authority. mahmoud abbas. he's in the west bank. that's on the opposite side of israel from gaza. he's going to be talking -- talking to the palestinian authority, it is a way really to communicate with hamas. now, clinton cannot speak with hamas directly because the united states considers it a terrorist group. so by talking to palestinians she can reach hamas. talking to egypt's president is going to be her last stop. as we see here. so by talking to egypt, that's another way for her to
? the president mohammed morsi knows that this is happening? >> i will put it this way. the weaponry goes to the red sea from iran. they also come from libya and at certain points, they all cost to egyptian territory. certainly, there is a responsibility to step up to the plate and stop the smuggling. egypt has been constructed from the past. we hope they will continue to fulfill this role now in the future. jenna: i ask that question because we know how important this relationship is for your country and all of ours. i want to talk about "the new york times" article that he wrote about today. it was published and he said that hamas is not interested in peace. they want violence and they want to promote terror. it is not a rational thing according to the way that you laid this out. why negotiate at all through any here in this region? >> they don't want to negotiate at all, they don't want to speak with us. they want to destroy us. they don't actually want to just kill israelis, but jews throughout the world. they are a genocide organization. but they can negotiate with egypt and others w
, then go to israel, to cairo, to meet with mohammed morsi. what are you hearing about what's come out of her talks with netanyahu? >> well, they met for about two hours, and it wasn't just with the prime minister, but the defense minister of israel, the foreign minister, the national security team. they spent two hours going over what's going on. the statement released by the state department says she was briefed on the israeli position on all these issues. she's making it clear she wants to see a deescalation of what's going on. she uses the word a calm. they are avoiding the word cease-fire for right now but throughout the day, as you know, there was speculation coming from hamas and egyptian officials that they were close to a cease-fire agreement. the israelis downplaying that possibility, saying they weren't there until they actually had an agreement. there's no agreement and if anything, it looks like there was an intensification of the shelling in southern israel today by hamas and an intensification of israeli attacks in gaza witnessed by what happened to you guys, what you sa
and will meet with egyptian president mohamed morsi later today. >> the goal must be a durable outcome that promotes regional stability and advance the security and legitimate aspirations of israelis and palestinians alike. >> reporter: egyptian president mohamed morsi is seen as critical to any peace deal. his muslim brotherhood is hamas' parent organization but egypt also has close ties to america and relies heavily on u.s. aid. susan mcginnis, cbs news, washington. >>> many journalists covering the conflict are caught in the middle. this is what cbs reporter charlie d'agata saw from his gaza city hotel early this morning. the israeli military launched dozens of air strikes. he tweeted that he and his colleagues are okay. >>> 5:09. the man who shot and killed two people at the richmond/san rafael bridge toll plaza laughed while receiving his death sentence in court yesterday. a contra costa county jury contributed for two days before determining that nathan burris should receive the death penalty. during the trial he frequently mocked the victims' families. >> i can never forgive him
will head to cairo where she'll have face-to-face meetings with egyptian president mohamed morsi. >> the goal must be a durable outcome that promotes regional stability and advances the security and legitimate aspirations of israelis and palestinians alike. >> want to begin with reza sayah, live for us in cairo. she mentioned in her comments that she is on her way to have meetings with the egyptian president, morsi, at the same time, offering any assistance that israel might need. tell me a little bit about the positioning and navigating she has to do in her meeting with mr. morsi. >> soledad, we can report to you that, according to the u.s. embassy here, secretary clinton has arrived here in cairo and she's going to be meeting with egyptian president mohamed morsi very soon. with the violence escalating, the spotlight, the pressure is on secretary clinton and washington. the u.s. seems to be broadening its role. the key role the u.s. is going to play here is with its sway over israel. obviously, israel and washington are best friends. washington has a lot of influence with israe
meeting with mohamed morsi. you know the deal. take a look at pictures. the fighting in gaza intense overnight. 27 more palestinians killed by israeli air strikes bringing the death toll to 137. >>> meantime, police in arizona have no idea why a pickup truck driver was driving the wrong way on the highway when he collided head-on with a tour bus. the 78-year-old man was killed instantly when his vehicle burst into flames near i-10 near case grande. >>> the church of england is saying no to women bishops. the church's governing body didn't get the two-thirds majority it needed topaz the measure. it did have enough in the house of clergy but did not get enough votes falling short by just four votes. >>> a new heart pump has just been approved by the food and drug administration. the hardware's ventricular system is a battery-powered device that's planted in the chest. it's smaller than previously-approved heart pumps. it could be easier for patients to tolerate. >>> here we are on this holiday week. we have to talk holiday travel. i'm hopping on a plane tomorrow. kind of curious how th
-fire's holding so far. >> and you thank egypt's president mohamed morsi for that? >> he is so far now proving to be a constructive partner certainly as proven in this last operation. >> is he honoring the peace treaty with israel? >> i think there's peace between egypt and israel on a daily basis, yes. >> what about syria? what would you like to see the government of israel as far as syria is concerned? because it's intense what's going on right now. about 40,000 people have been killed over the past year and a half. >> it's horrible. it's a terrible tragedy. we, the people of israel, look at the people of syria with great respect, even awe standing up and risking and even giving their lives for freedom from the terrible bashar al assad regime. we want them to go. we've long wanted him to depart. he is an ally of iran. he has not only killed 40,000 of his own people, he's tried to make a secret nuclear military program, he's helped in providing tens and tens of thousands of missiles to terrorists in lebanon and gaza. he is a loose cannon. we want him gone. we want to see a democratic and peac
negotiations, u.s. secretary of state hillary clinton and egyptian president mohamed morsi announced a cease-fire. >> the united states welcomes the cease-fire in gaza. for it to hold, the rockets must end for it to create a broader calm. >> reporter: and israeli president benjamin netanyahu talks with reporters. >> i know there are those who expect an even more intense military response. and that may, perhaps, be needed. but at this time, the right thing for the state of israel is to exhaust this opportunity to obtain a long-term cease-fire. >> throughout gaza, celebration and gunfire rings out. the leader of hamas is defiant. >> israel, in all its goals have failed, thanks to god. >> reporter: and on the streets of gaza city, massive crowds and traffic. the tension, seemingly gone as people celebrate the cease-fire and leave their homes for the first time in days. >> i haven't seen this many people in the streets of gaza for quite sometime. you can hear the mosques blaring, the horns honking. people whistling, cheering. >> reporter: and let's go over to gaza city right now, ben wedeman is
mohammed morsi will try to explain reasons for giving himself nearly absolute power. he and his backer notice muslim brotherhood argued he needed to do it to speed along the transition to a new government. the move has sparked new rallies which have turned violent at times. [chanting] >> shepard: meantime judges on egypt's highest court who lost their power under this decree today went on strike and say they will not return to work until the president gives up the sweeping powers that he somehow granted himself. palestinian leaders predict they are going to score historic win tomorrow when the united nations votes on whether to recognize a palestinian state. analysts expect the vote to pass and by a big majority it would grant palestine only limited understood -- statehood. against the effort it could give palestinians new leverage against israel. mahmoud abbas has said he will not negotiate with israel as long as it keeps expanding settlements in the west bank. and the israeli prime minister has refused to freeze that construction. "the fox report's" correspondent jonathan hunt is at
-fire deal brokered largely over the phone. president obama and the president of egypt, mohamed morsi, apparently making a real connection to stop the carnage. i want to begin our coverage here of the very fragile truce with arwa damon live with us this morning in gaza city. arwa, i think i hear horns honking. is the celebration there continuing where you are? >> reporter: it is. although the crowds have tapered off a little bit. but it is pretty incredible when you look at the street down below us and compare it to what the situation was like 24 hours ago, when you would hardly see a single person outside and most of the shops were shut. you can see very close to where people were gathering, celebrating what they're calling a victory. just one of the many locations that were bombed during this most recent conflict. that was, in fact, a residential home. the israelis, when they struck it later on, saying that they believe that it was being used by a senior hamas commander as an intelligence operations center. but people, ever since the cease-fire was announced, were taking to the stre
maccallum. gregg: i'm gregg jarrett in for bill hemmer. hillary clinton met with mohammed morsi, and another meeting with mahmoud abbas, and then with benjamin netanyahu she expressed a commitment to israel. >> america's commitment to israel's security is rock solid and unwaivering, that is why we believe it is essential to de-escalate the situation in gaza. heather: doug mcelway joins us live if the white house. what is the latest with the talks with secretary clinton? >> reporter: no read out yet on the talks ao egyptian president morsi yet. we did get a read out on her talks with mahmoud abbas. no signs of any kind of progress or breakthrough, but just appreciation for the effort. the move towards the cease-fire very much come phra ka*eulted by thcomplicated by a terrorist attack on a bus. the white house condemned the attack in the strongest language. these attacks against israeli civilians are outrageous. the united states will stand with our israeli allies and identify and bring to justice the perpetrators of this attack. that statement very much in line with a number of administration
mohammed morsi to give back some of the sweeping powers that he seized earlier in the week. want to go live to cairo. reza sayah is overlooking tahrir square. is it calm where you are, and are people assuming that things are going to get better? there are a lot of critics who vague the broum brotherhood is really now trying to hijack the process, hijack the constitution and get the president to remain in power, as much power as he can hold on to. >> yeah. many of those critics, suzanne, are behind us. still demonstrating here in tahrir square. in the meantime, major developments unfolding. as we speak right now, egypt's constitutional assembly is voting to approve a draft of egypt's all-important new constitution. this is going to be the backbone, the centerpiece of egypt's democratic transition. all of egypt's laws are going to be based on this document. everything from the balance of power between the president and the parliament, the power of the army, the independence of the judiciary, the personal freedoms. once this draft is approved and all indications are it is going to be approved.
. that new government of mohamed morsi who himself is a member of the muslim brotherhood. there's a lot of sympathy in egypt for hamas. but on the other hand, egypt does want to play a constructive role because they know that they need the help of the united states, the help of the eu, the help of the international community for their economy. so it's a very delicate type of balance. hillary clinton knows the players. she's met several times with benjamin netanyahu. she's met with mahmud abbas, and she really knows the issues, so she's the perfect person to do it. >> jill, it is speculation, but it seems to me that the secretary of state would not be on her way to the middle east at this moment if a ground invasion were imminent. that is not a split-screen picture that the u.s. would like to see, no doubt. but as you said, a lot of what she'll be doing is working the allies. that's what the president's been doing, on the phone with turkey, egypt, countries in the region trying to stabilize the overall area. why is that? >> reporter: absolutely. secretary clinton has been making even mor
rushing a vote on a final draft of a constitution as protests continue against the president, mohammed morsy. he has faced bitter criticism. >>> the state of texas has filed papers to seize a large ranch owned by the flds, a fundamentalist radical mormon sex that believes in polygamy. its leader, warren jeffs, is serving a life sentence. >>> you never know what you might see on the streets of new york city this is a first. casper the pony and razzie the zebra roaming free on staten island. they got free from the home where they lived. they were returned home safe and sound. >> can you imagine mommy, mommy, look. >> they are getting along just fine. >> moment of kindness captured with a camera. coming up, a young police officer's deed goes viral for all the right reasons.od ays. and some difficult ones. but, through it all, we've persevered, supporting some of the biggest ideas in modern history. so why should our anniversary matter to you? because for 200 years, we've been helping ideas move from ambition to achievement. and the next great idea could be yours. ♪ part of a whole new l
Search Results 0 to 34 of about 35 (some duplicates have been removed)